Karadzic conviction "seems virtually certain"

25 February 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has a busy month ahead. As it prepares to close its doors next year it will hand down verdicts in two of its last trials. The Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic will hear a judgement in his historic case on 24 March, which could expand genocide in Bosnia beyond Srebrenica. A week later judges will hand down their ruling in the trial of firebrand Serb politician Vojislav Seselj, which has been shrouded in controversy. IJT asked Marko Milanovic, associate professor of law at the University of Nottingham and longtime ICTY observer, about what’s at stake in both cases.

 

Radovan Karadzic before ICTY
Image caption: 
Radovan Karadzic at the start of his defence case before the ICTY in October 2013 (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)

Historically, the case of Radovan Karadzic is important; this was the top Bosnian Serb leader during the war. But what will this case add to the jurisprudence of the tribunal?

Want to read more?

If you subscribe to a free membership, you can read this article and explore our full archive, dating back to 1997.

Subscribe now