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30 September 2009 by -

The 90th edition of the International Justice Tribune is now available. You can read it here.

Download the print version of the International Justice Tribune 90 (PDF file)

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30 September 2009 by Thijs Bouwknegt

For the last two months, former Liberian president Charles Taylor has been testifying in his own defence before the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). But despite an initial flurry of coverage, the public gallery and pressroom have been virtually empty for most of that time. As the court heads for a three-week recess starting October 5th, the IJT takes a look at the defence strategy thus far.

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30 September 2009 by John Kollie

The appearance of former Liberian president Charles Taylor before the United Nations backed Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) in The Hague is generating huge interest and excitement in his home country.

issue
30 September 2009

Taylor takes the stand

For the last two months, former Liberian president Charles Taylor has been testifying in his own defence before the Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL). But despite an initial flurry of coverage, the public gallery and pressroom have been virtually empty for most of that time. As the court heads for a three-week recess starting October 5th, the IJT takes a look at the defence strategy thus far. 

Liberians gripped by Taylor trial

The appearance of former Liberian president Charles Taylor before the United Nations backed Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) in The Hague is generating huge interest and excitement in his home country. 

Interview: Mark Danner on US torture inquiry

When United States Attorney General Eric Holder last month appointed a special prosecutor to investigate allegations of CIA prisoner abuse, he must have known that he was opening a political can of worms. But, as US journalist Mark Danner argues, by choosing to investigate only those agents who operated outside the guidelines laid down in the notorious Bush administration “torture memos”, Holder also risks setting some unwelcome legal precedents. 

Brief news:

"Death flight"pilot held

An Argentine-Dutch pilot was arrested in Spain on September 22nd at the request of Argentina.

ICTR: Genocide indictee arrives in Arusha

A former Rwandan politician indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) for his role in the 1994 genocide, was brought to Arusha on September 20th after being arrested in the neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). At his initial appearance before the court, he pleaded not guilty to all charges. 

ICC: Germain Katanga to stand trial

The appeals chamber of the International Criminal Court (ICC) has rejected a claim by Congolese militia leader Germain Katanga that he should not be prosecuted before the ICC.

USA: CACI International cleared of Abu Ghraib crimes

The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has reversed a lower level court’s ruling that CACI International must face a lawsuit regarding alleged abuses at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. 

 

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30 September 2009 by Hermione Gee

When United States Attorney General Eric Holder last month appointed a special prosecutor to investigate allegations of CIA prisoner abuse, he must have known that he was opening a political can of worms. But, as US journalist Mark Danner argues, by choosing to investigate only those agents who operated outside the guidelines laid down in the notorious Bush administration “torture memos”, Holder also risks setting some unwelcome legal precedents.

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17 September 2009 by -

Former Democratic Republic of Congo Vice President and war crimes suspect Jean-Pierre Bemba is still being held at the International Criminal Court (ICC), despite a decision of provisional release taken by the court last month.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

ICC Chief Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo appealed the ruling and on September 3rd, the Appeals Chamber suspended Bemba’s release until it reaches a final decision.

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16 September 2009 by -

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) convicted Florence Hartmann of contempt of court for quoting confidential court documents in her publications.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The September 14th ruling ordered Hartmann – a former spokesperson for ICTY Chief Prosecutor Carla del Ponte – to pay a fine of 7,000 euros.

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16 September 2009 by -

As we re-launch the International Justice Tribune after an absence of more than a year, we want to take this opportunity to remind our readers of how we see our role here at the IJT, and why we thought it important to bring back our bi-weekly international criminal justice magazine.

The need for global coverage of transitional justice becomes more pressing every year.

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16 September 2009 by -

Arrested in May 2008, former Democratic Republic of Congo Vice President and war crimes suspect Jean-Pierre Bemba is still being held at the International Criminal Court (ICC), despite a decision of provisional release taken by the court last month.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

ICC Chief Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo appealed the ruling and on September 3rd, the Appeals Chamber decided to suspend the implementation of Bemba’s interim release until it reaches a final decision.

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16 September 2009 by -

Chief prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC), Luis Moreno Ocampo, is gathering information about possible war crimes committed by NATO soldiers, Al Qaeda and insurgents in Afghanistan.

By Thijs Bouwknegt
 

Afghanistan is a party to the Rome Statute and “any war crime or crime against humanity committed on its territory by Afghan nationals or foreigners is of interest to the court”, Ocampo told reporters September 9th.

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