article
14 October 2009 by -

Dutch Justice Minister Ernst Hirsch Ballin has drafted a bill that will extend the possibility of detecting and prosecuting genocide. The bill allows the Netherlands to better address war crimes and genocide suspects retroactively and to work closer with international criminal courts. The proposed bill stipulates that cases dating back as far as 1966 could be dealt with.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

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14 October 2009 by Franck Petit

Appointed to a three-year term by the United Nations Secretary General last March, the French lawyer François Roux will take up his new role as head of the Defence Office at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) at the end of this month. During his 30-year career as an international lawyer, Roux has spent ten years working with international criminal tribunals. 

issue
14 October 2009

Special Tribunal for Lebanon on the back burner

Six months after the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) opened its doors, a drastically changed political and security environment in Lebanon, coupled with trim concrete output from The Hague, are driving even some of the tribunal’s staunchest advocates to adopt an increasingly cautious stance towards the court. This is visible in both dampened expectations and increasing questions as to whether the very mechanism will prove to be the best model for trying a crime of terrorism.

Radovan Karadzic “not ready for trial”

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is working hard on his defence case from his prison cell in Scheveningen. Since the beginning of his pre-trial proceedings before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) 14 months ago, he has filed more than a hundred motions – including one that claims that former United States Special Envoy Richard Holbrooke had promised him immunity from prosecution.

Interview: Changing attitudes at STL

Appointed to a three-year term by the United Nations Secretary General last March, the French lawyer François Roux will take up his new role as head of the Defence Office at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) at the end of this month. During his 30-year career as an international lawyer, Roux has spent ten years working with international criminal tribunals. 

Brief news:

Dutch push harder to prosecute genocide

Dutch Justice Minister Ernst Hirsch Ballin has drafted a bill to allow national courts to prosecute cases of genocide dating back as far as 1966. 

ICTR: Nizeyimana to plead; Gatete on trial

Idelphonse Nizeyimana will appear before the ICTR this Wednesday following his arrest in Uganda earlier this month. 

ICTY: Plea to Bosnian parliament

The ICTY expressed its concern with the decision by the Bosnian parliament not to extend the mandates of international judges and prosecutors at the State Court and Prosecutor’s Office. 

International Criminal Court to hear Darfur case

The International Criminal Court will start confirmation of charges hearings in the case against Darfur rebel leader Abu Garda on Monday 19 October. 

article
14 October 2009 by Lynn Maalouf

Six months after the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) opened its doors, a drastically changed political and security environment in Lebanon, coupled with trim concrete output from The Hague, are driving even some of the tribunal’s staunchest advocates to adopt an increasingly cautious stance towards the court. This is visible in both dampened expectations and increasing questions as to whether the very mechanism will prove to be the best model for trying a crime of terrorism.

article
14 October 2009 by Sebastiaan Gottlieb

Former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is working hard on his defence case from his prison cell in Scheveningen. Since the beginning of his pre-trial proceedings before the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) 14 months ago, he has filed more than a hundred motions – including one that claims that former United States Special Envoy Richard Holbrooke had promised him immunity from prosecution.

article
01 October 2009 by -

The International Justice Tribune has published its 90th edition. Read it here.

Dowload the International Justice Tribune No.90

Subscribe to the bi-weekly magazine

article
30 September 2009 by -

The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has reversed a lower level court’s ruling that CACI International must face a lawsuit regarding alleged abuses at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.

By Karl Dowling

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30 September 2009 by -

The appeals chamber of the International Criminal Court (ICC) has rejected a claim by Congolese militia leader Germain Katanga that he should not be prosecuted before the ICC.

By Thijs Bouwknegt, The Hague

Katanga asked that the case be dismissed, arguing that the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) was able to prosecute him, and that the ICC prosecutor failed to disclose documents indicating that he was under investigation in the DRC.

article
30 September 2009 by -

A former Rwandan politician indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) for his role in the 1994 genocide, was brought to Arusha on September 20th after being arrested in the neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). At his initial appearance before the court, he pleaded not guilty to all charges.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

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30 September 2009 by -

An Argentine-Dutch pilot was arrested in Spain on September 22nd at the request of Argentina.

By Karl Dowling

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