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30 November 1999 by BENJAMIN BIBAS and EMMANUEL CHICON

The former deputy registrar of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), David Tolbert, took up his new post as ICTY deputy prosecutor on 30 August, reports the c ...

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30 November 1999 by INGRID SEYMAN

The tide seems to have turned for former South American dictators. Argentina's Supreme Court has just accepted the imprescriptibility of a crime against humanity, while in Chile a trial look ...

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30 November 1999 by KELVIN LEWIS

Human Rights Watch (HRW), in its report published on 8 September, urges the Special Court for Sierra Leone not to limit its prosecution to the thirteen people it has indicted so far (of who ...

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30 November 1999 by Thierry Cruvellier

66.784,200 euros: this was the official budget allocated to the International Criminal Court for 2005 at the close of the Assembly of State Parties held at The Hague from 6 to 10 September. ...

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30 November 1999 by KELVIN LEWIS

Sam Hinga Norman, the former national coordinator of the Civil Defence Force (CDF), the principal armed group to back the return of the civilian authorities to Freetown, has apparently prepa ...

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30 November 1999 by BENJAMIN BIBAS and EMMANUEL CHICON

The Moroccan Equity and Reconciliation Commission (IER), crea- ted by royal decree in April 2004, is now halfway through its mandate. A unique experience in the Arab-Muslim world, this ...

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30 November 1999 by ARNAUD GRELLIER

The first trial of the former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet could take place in France ? without him. On 22 October, the Paris prose- cutor's office called for the case to be referred be ...

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30 November 1999 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Over the last few weeks, British defence counsels Steven Kay and Gillian Higgins have given the Appeals Chamber of the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) the opportunity to straighten out a trial gone awry after the Trial Chamber judges' decision of 3 September 2004 to impose defence counsel upon an unwilling Slobodan Milosevic.

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30 November 1999 by ANDRE-MICHEL ESSOUNGOU

“Counsel Degli has committed acts of dishonesty, fraud and deception. These serious breaches of professional ethics justify his withdrawal from the case.” This was the unequivocal tone of the decision taken on 27 October by the administration of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) to dismiss the lawyer representing General Gratien Kabiligi. The radical decision was taken following an ICTY enquiry, which on the face of it looks extremely damaging for the Togolese lawyer. 

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30 November 1999

All defendants boycott trials at special court

The youthful interim leader of the former Rebel Revolutionary United Front (RUF) movement, the self-styled General Issa Sesay, has ordered his former battle group commander Morris Kallon to join him and all the other defendants in the ongoing war crimes trials in Sierra Leone to boycott court hearings.

Military shambles

Over the last few years, speed and firmness have been the official watchwords at hearings before the Arusha Tribunal. Yet, both are sorely lacking in Military II trial which involves the former chief of staff of the army, General Augustin Bizimungu, the former chief of staff of the gendarmerie, General Augustin Ndindiliyimana, the former commander of the reconnaissance battalion Major François-Xavier Nzuwonemeye, and his second in command, Captain Innocent Sagahutu.

Milosevic in self defence

Slobodan Milosevic sounded almost jubilant when he called two French witnesses, both former UNPROFOR members sympathetic to the suffering of the Serb people. Nurse Eve Crepin's testimony was so general that presiding judge Patrick Robinson dismissed it as "a conversation with a cup of tea on the veranda". But her partner, former army doctor Patrick Barriot, gave evidence that sparked intense questioning from both prosecutors and judges.

Guantanamo trials in deadlock

Three years after the creation of the Guantanamo prison, the 550 detainees in the war on terrorism risk filling up American courtrooms. Lawyers and human rights activists are attacking every aspect of the legal strategy set up by the American administration to try so-called enemy combatants. In such a context, the next few months will prove critical for the success or failure of the military commissions.

 

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