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20 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

66.784,200 euros: this was the official budget allocated to the International Criminal Court for 2005 at the close of the Assembly of State Parties held at The Hague from 6 to 10 September. It was a success for those who feared funding cuts. But many participants bitterly lamented the lack of passion that marked the week's meeting.

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20 September 2004 by INGRID SEYMAN

The tide seems to have turned for former South American dictators. Argentina's Supreme Court has just accepted the imprescriptibility of a crime against humanity, while in Chile a trial looks likely for Augusto Pinochet after the former dictator was stripped of his immunity on 26 August.

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06 September 2004 by our correspondent

Relations between the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and the Rwandan government were the topic of two announcements made by the ICTR prosecutor Hassan Jallow at the end of August.

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06 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

"Pa bavite se!" "Well, you deal with that!" Slobodan Milosevic shouted to the court, his arms outstretched as if throwing a sack of hot potatoes towards the feet of his judges. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) had not only just decided to end the three-year freedom of the Serbian ex-head of state to conduct his own defence. It also had the temerity to ask him how he wanted to proceed from now on.

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06 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

In the space of a week, just before the summer recess, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has handed down one life sentence, confirmed a second and heard the parties debate two other appeal verdicts. The four cases all concern Rwandan personalities prosecuted for crimes committed in 1994 in the same region, eastern Kibuye.

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06 September 2004 by our correspondent

The start of trial proceedings against Saddam Hussein has sparked reactions in Kuwait and Iran, both direct victims of the toppled Baathist regime's aggression.

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19 July 2004 by our correspondent

Will light ever be shed on events leading to the disappearance in April 1975 of the former president of the Cambodian national assembly Ung Boun-Hor, who was forced to leave his refuge at the French Embassy in Khmer Rouge-occupied Phnom Penh?

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19 July 2004 by Christine Chaumeau

On 15 July the Cambodian national assembly re-elected Prime Minister Hun Sen and endorsed the new coalition government, thus putting an end to a year-long political crisis. This turn of events should help to unblock the vote on the bill to create a court to try the Khmer Rouge leadership for genocide. For the majority of Cambodian observers, the prospect of such a trial does not inspire enthusiasm. It is seen as a sea-snake that has plagued the troubled waters of Cambodian politics for the last seven years, or, in the words of one observer, "a Dracula whose creators want to get rid of it but who survives in spite of the blows struck against it."

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05 July 2004 by our correspondent

On June 8, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) convicted France of failing to prepare its case against the Rwandan priest Wenceslas Munyeshyaka within a reasonable timeframe. The initial complaint, implicating him in the 1994 genocide, was filed nine years ago in July 1995. Although this is the first time such a case has been heard before the ECHR, the situation is not unique. Complaints filed between 1995 and 2001 against four Rwandans suspected of genocide who are residing in France are still pending in the French courts.

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05 July 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

On 23 June, the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) Luis Moreno Ocampo announced he was opening his first investigations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). According to his press release, Ocampo has already been "carefully analysing the situation in DRC" since July 2003. But the new step, which marks the difference between a "preliminary analysis" and the opening of an investigation, is notable for the legal process that could lead to the first trials before the international court, and is highly significant in the current political context.

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