article
06 September 2004 by our correspondent

The start of trial proceedings against Saddam Hussein has sparked reactions in Kuwait and Iran, both direct victims of the toppled Baathist regime's aggression.

article
19 July 2004 by our correspondent

Will light ever be shed on events leading to the disappearance in April 1975 of the former president of the Cambodian national assembly Ung Boun-Hor, who was forced to leave his refuge at the French Embassy in Khmer Rouge-occupied Phnom Penh?

article
19 July 2004 by Christine Chaumeau

On 15 July the Cambodian national assembly re-elected Prime Minister Hun Sen and endorsed the new coalition government, thus putting an end to a year-long political crisis. This turn of events should help to unblock the vote on the bill to create a court to try the Khmer Rouge leadership for genocide. For the majority of Cambodian observers, the prospect of such a trial does not inspire enthusiasm. It is seen as a sea-snake that has plagued the troubled waters of Cambodian politics for the last seven years, or, in the words of one observer, "a Dracula whose creators want to get rid of it but who survives in spite of the blows struck against it."

article
05 July 2004 by our correspondent

On June 8, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) convicted France of failing to prepare its case against the Rwandan priest Wenceslas Munyeshyaka within a reasonable timeframe. The initial complaint, implicating him in the 1994 genocide, was filed nine years ago in July 1995. Although this is the first time such a case has been heard before the ECHR, the situation is not unique. Complaints filed between 1995 and 2001 against four Rwandans suspected of genocide who are residing in France are still pending in the French courts.

article
05 July 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

On 23 June, the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) Luis Moreno Ocampo announced he was opening his first investigations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). According to his press release, Ocampo has already been "carefully analysing the situation in DRC" since July 2003. But the new step, which marks the difference between a "preliminary analysis" and the opening of an investigation, is notable for the legal process that could lead to the first trials before the international court, and is highly significant in the current political context.

article
21 June 2004 by our correspondent

Sylvestre Gacumbitsi, the former mayor of Rusumo, Kibungo province (eastern Rwanda), has been sentenced to 30 years in prison for genocide and crimes against humanity (extermination and rape). "Gacumbitsi led the attacks on the Tutsi civilians gathered at the Nyarubuye church and personally took part in these attacks," concludes the judgement, which was delivered on 17 June by Senegalese judge Andrésia Vaz, presiding over trial chamber 3 at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). 

article
07 June 2004 by INGRID SEYMAN

On 28 May 2004, the Santiago court of appeal stripped former military leader Augusto Pinochet of his immunity from prosecution. If the Chilean Supreme Court confirms this ruling, the 88-year old ex-dictator could stand trial for his part in Operation Condor, a coordinated campaign in the 1970s by several Latin American military dictatorships to assassinate hundreds of suspected opponents.

article
07 June 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier and Kelvin Lewis

Freetown, 3 June 2004. All the signs pointed to a smooth opening day in the trial of Sam Hinga Norman, national coordinator of the Civil Defence Forces (CDF), his number two, Moinina Fofana, and Allieu Kondewa, responsible for initiation ceremonies for the pro-government militia.

issue
05 April 2004
issue
27 November 2003

Pages