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04 October 2004 by Heikelina Verrijn

After arriving at The Hague in 1996, Tihomir Blaskic, a former colonel in the HVO (Croatian Defence Council), told his wife and son it would take three months to defend himself against charges that he had command responsibility for one of the war's most horrendous massacres: the Ahmici massacre in the Lasva Valley in April 1993. On 2 August this year, after a case with more than its share of twists and turns, Blaskic was released after being resentenced on appeal to nine years.

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04 October 2004 by Arnoud Grellier

The sensitive issue of cooperation between Serbia and the ICTY is on the agenda in a meeting on 4 October between the prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) Carla del Ponte and Serbian president Boris Tadic, accompanied by his prime minister Vojislav Kostunika. Del Ponte's arrival in Belgrade on 1 October coincides with mounting pressure from the international community for Serbia to do more in its power to hand over war criminals, including the ICTY's most wanted fugitive, Ratko Mladic.

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04 October 2004 by our correspondent

After the 1994 Rwandan genocide, few people would have believed that two officers with such contrasting profiles would find themselves in a joint billing at the Arusha court. Yet since September 20, and accompanied by two other high-level officers from the ex-Rwandan Armed Forces (FAR), Generals Augustin Ndindiliyimana and Augustin Bizimungu have appeared side by side before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). 

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20 September 2004 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN-STUART

On 15 September, the trial of Slobodan Milosevic was adjourned for a month. After imposing lawyers on the accused and hea- ring only two defence witnesses, the Court was forced into an impasse when dozens of defence witnesses suddenly refused to give evidence in the space of a few days at The Hague.

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20 September 2004 by our correspondent

Human Rights Watch (HRW), in its report published on 8 September, urges the Special Court for Sierra Leone not to limit its prosecution to the thirteen people it has indicted so far (of who only nine are in custody).

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20 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

66.784,200 euros: this was the official budget allocated to the International Criminal Court for 2005 at the close of the Assembly of State Parties held at The Hague from 6 to 10 September. It was a success for those who feared funding cuts. But many participants bitterly lamented the lack of passion that marked the week's meeting.

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20 September 2004 by INGRID SEYMAN

The tide seems to have turned for former South American dictators. Argentina's Supreme Court has just accepted the imprescriptibility of a crime against humanity, while in Chile a trial looks likely for Augusto Pinochet after the former dictator was stripped of his immunity on 26 August.

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06 September 2004 by our correspondent

Relations between the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) and the Rwandan government were the topic of two announcements made by the ICTR prosecutor Hassan Jallow at the end of August.

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06 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

"Pa bavite se!" "Well, you deal with that!" Slobodan Milosevic shouted to the court, his arms outstretched as if throwing a sack of hot potatoes towards the feet of his judges. The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) had not only just decided to end the three-year freedom of the Serbian ex-head of state to conduct his own defence. It also had the temerity to ask him how he wanted to proceed from now on.

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06 September 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

In the space of a week, just before the summer recess, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) has handed down one life sentence, confirmed a second and heard the parties debate two other appeal verdicts. The four cases all concern Rwandan personalities prosecuted for crimes committed in 1994 in the same region, eastern Kibuye.

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