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20 December 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

At the beginning of the New Year, if the judges at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) stick to the terms of the agreement between the defence and the prosecutor, Vincent Rutaganira can consider himself a lucky man. On 8 December, the former district councillor of a small town in western Rwanda not only became the fourth Rwandan to plead guilty before a UN court. He will also be distinguished by the unprecedented conditions in which the prosecutor accepted his confession. 

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06 December 2004 by David Lewis

Back from his visit to this isolated town in the south-eastern province of Katanga, in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Colonel Mbombo Nzadi seems satisfied. He considers that "it was essential for us to speak to the people on the ground and better understand the circumstances" and therefore that the visit by the tribunal "has helped".

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06 December 2004 by André-Michel

Once more, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) is walking on very thin ice. Not only is it reeling from having lost an entire year in the Government I trial, but serious problems now threaten to short-circuit the Military I trial.

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06 December 2004 by our correspondent

Nothing seems to be going right for the Government I trial at the Arusha Tribunal. The trial, which began a year ago, was adjourned after six months, and then, in October, the Appeals Chamber ordered it to start again from scratch before a new panel of judges. Today, it is the focus of renewed battles between defence teams and the prosecutor's office.

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06 December 2004 by Arnoud Grellier

On 22 November, judges at the Paris Appeals Court threw out all proceedings related to the disappearances at the Brazzaville Beach port. In doing so, they have probably buried the case for good. They also spared Congo-Brazzaville's leaders from prosecution for their alleged role in the disappearance of 353 refugees sailing into the Brazzaville port from the Democratic Republic of Congo in May 1999.

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22 November 2004 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Almost ten years after Bosnian Serb forces massacred nearly eight thousand Bosnians in Srebrenica, their ghosts continue to prick the conscience of the powerful western countries in charge of protecting them under the UN banner.

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22 November 2004 by Arnoud Grellier

The first trial of the former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet could take place in France - without him. On 22 October, the Paris prosecutor's office called for the case to be referred before the Paris criminal court, where the former president would be tried in absentia for the "abduction and torture" of several French nationals and Franco-Chileans who disappeared between 1973 and 1975.

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18 October 2004 by Arnoud Grellier

A new legal front against Augusto Pinochet could begin on 5 November when Chile's Appeals Court examines another request to strip the former dictator of his legal immunity. The demand was filed on 5 October by the daughters of Carlos Prats, the former commander-in-chief of the army and ex vice-president, who was murdered in Buenos Aires in September 1974.

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18 October 2004 by our correspondent

The TRC report devotes no less than 60 pages to the turbulent relationship between the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Special Court for Sierra Leone. Working in parallel with the TRC, the court is mandated to try a handful of suspects thought to be chiefly responsible for crimes committed during the civil war.

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18 October 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

For those who have followed the tribulations of the Sierra Leone Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) for almost three years, its official report, which was published on 5 October, constitutes a small miracle. No one could have predicted such a logically structured, abundantly detailed, and well-written report two years ago when the Commission almost dissolved itself through sheer negligence. Even a year ago when the report was first due out, hopes for a turnaround were not high.

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