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14 March 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

The big event was the opening on 9 March of the special war crimes chamber in Sarajevo. But a week earlier the Bosnian media was buzzing with shocked reactions to the indictment and departure to The Hague of the retired Bosnian general, Rasim Delic. The outcry caused by the surrender of Delic, who is seen as a "war hero", raises questions over whether the Bosnian environment is mature enough to ensure a fair trial for defendants on all sides of the conflict in former Yugoslavia, especially Bosnian Muslims.

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14 March 2005 by Laurent Abadie

The Prime Minister of Kosovo, Ramush Haradinaj, who is accused of crimes against humanity and of violating the laws and customs of war, is the first serving politician to be indicted by the ICTY since the ex-Yugoslav president, Slobodan Milosevic. A former commander of the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA), Haradinaj was elected by parliament on 3 December to serve in the UN-administered province. On 8 March, he resigned, preferring to face the UN court "as a common citizen".

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14 March 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

There is no doubt in the minds of donors backing the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY): all trials must be completed by 2008. The ICTY prosecutor has now seriously begun tackling the process of transferring cases to local courts, with 8 requests for transferral involving 16 accused submitted to the judges.

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21 February 2005 by our correspondent

Last week's deposition by Pauline Nyiramasuhuko's eldest daughter was, at best, a rare illustration of openness in court. Clarisse Ntahobali, one of seven initial witnesses called by the defence, testified using her own name, although the curtains remained closed to hide her face. She began by helping to sketch out the educational and professional career of her mother, the only woman to be indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR).

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21 February 2005 by Thierry Cruvellier

Every year, the run-up to the annual commemoration of the Rwandan genocide that began on April 1994, generates a flurry of legal activity. This year is no different, with a number of complaints lodged last year continuing or being repeated in 2005. Last week in Spain and France, NGOs from opposing political camps announced they were filing new complaints, while in Rwanda, the start of the gacaca trials is now set for March.

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07 February 2005 by Franck Petit

Uganda and Côte d'Ivoire : the ICC prosecutor puts his cards on the table, but debate continues in the UN Security Council over Darfur.

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07 February 2005 by BENJAMIN BIBAS and EMMANUEL CHICON

With its official report due out in the spring, the Morocco's Equity and Reconciliation Commission (IER) needs to act fast. After its inaugural hearing on 21-22 December in Rabat, the Commission is starting to fan out its public sessions in those regions most affected by the repression during the "years of lead". 

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07 February 2005 by THIERRY CRUVELLIER WITH OUR CORRESPONDENTS IN THE HAGUE AND ARUSHA

The 31 December 2004 marked the official end of investigations at the two UN courts for Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia. Thus, it is now possible to make a preliminary accounting of the Tribunal's records of indictments.

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07 February 2005 by Christine Chaumeau

Three years after the creation of the Guantanamo prison, the 550 detainees in the war on terrorism risk filling up American courtrooms. Lawyers and human rights activists are attacking every aspect of the legal strategy set up by the American administration to try so-called enemy combatants. In such a context, the next few months will prove critical for the success or failure of the military commissions.

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07 February 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Slobodan Milosevic sounded almost jubilant when he called two French witnesses, both former UNPROFOR members sympathetic to the suffering of the Serb people. Nurse Eve Crepin's testimony was so general that presiding judge Patrick Robinson dismissed it as "a conversation with a cup of tea on the veranda". But her partner, former army doctor Patrick Barriot, gave evidence that sparked intense questioning from both prosecutors and judges.

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