article
24 February 2010 by -

French president Nicholas Sarkozy will arrive in Rwanda tomorrow, marking the first visit by a French leader since the 1994 genocide.

Tensions between the two countries peaked in 2006. Rwanda broke off diplomatic ties after a French judge issued arrest warrants against nine close associates of Rwandan president Paul Kagame. In 2008, Rwanda accused France of complicity in the genocide, naming 33 political and military officials it said should be put on trial.

article
24 February 2010 by -

The Liberian Senate has for the second time rejected six individuals nominated by President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to serve as commissioners on the Independent National Human Rights Commission of Liberia (INHCR).

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The creation of the INHCR was mandated in 2005 to promote and protect human rights in post-conflict Liberia, and oversee implementation of the country’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) final report. The TRC catalogued human rights abuses committed during Liberia’s two decades of conflict.

article
24 February 2010 by -

US prosecutors have filed fresh charges against Viktor Bout in a bid to have him extradited from Thailand. The suspected arms trafficker is believed to have sold weapons to the FARC, Taliban, al Qaeda and various African warlords.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The new indictment against Bout contains nine charges, including conspiracy, money laundering and wire fraud for allegedly trying to hide millions in profits from arms dealing. Bout is also accused of trying to buy planes from two Florida aviation companies in 2007, said US Attorney Preet Bharara.

article
24 February 2010 by -

The deputy prosecutor for the International Criminal Court (ICC) says it is likely that crimes against humanity were committed during a bloody crackdown on protesters in Guinea last year.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

Fatou Bensouda, who has just returned from a three-day visit to Guinea, said on Friday, “on the basis of the information that we have received from this visit, we will pursue our preliminary examination.”

article
24 February 2010 by Susanna Mehtonen

A Finnish court will begin hearings in Tanzania today in a case related to the Rwandan genocide. The District Court of East-Uusimaa has moved to Dar es Salaam to hear from 19 witnesses in the first Finnish case about universal jurisdiction and genocide.

issue
24 February 2010

Finnish court moves to Tanzania

A Finnish court will begin hearings in Tanzania today, in a case related to the Rwandan genocide. The District Court of East-Uusimaa has moved to Dar es Salaam to hear from 19 witnesses in the first Finnish case about universal jurisdiction and genocide. 

Whistleblower denied asylum

Austria came under fire earlier this month for refusing asylum to a Serbian man who turned over the infamous “Scorpion tape” to international prosecutors in The Hague. 

Duch trial may be first and last

When the Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) hands down its first verdict in the coming weeks, it will be a landmark for a tribunal mired in allegations of political interference. It will also be a judgment on a man who admitted responsibility for torture and killings at a Khmer Rouge prison he ran, but simultaneously argued that he was following orders he could not reject. 

Interview: “Trying to break the Kremlin walls”

“The government does not understand that [we] should be working for them, not against them”, says Tatyana Kasatkina, Executive Director of Memorial, a human rights research centre based in Moscow. It was founded towards the end of the Soviet era with the goal of preserving the societal memory of political persecution and oppression. Today it works in post-Soviet states, monitoring human rights and helping “to promote mature civil society and democracy based on the rule of law.” Kasatkina spoke to the IJT at her office in Moscow. 

article
24 February 2010 by Maria Morina

“The government does not understand that [we] should be working for them, not against them”, says Tatyana Kasatkina, Executive Director of Memorial, a human rights research centre based in Moscow. It was founded towards the end of the Soviet era with the goal of preserving the societal memory of political persecution and oppression. Today it works in post-Soviet states, monitoring human rights and helping “to promote mature civil society and democracy based on the rule of law.” Kasatkina spoke to the IJT at her office in Moscow. 

article
24 February 2010 by Jared Ferie

When the Extraordinary Chambers of the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) hands down its first verdict in the coming weeks, it will be a landmark for a tribunal mired in allegations of political interference. It will also be a judgment on a man who admitted responsibility for torture and killings at a Khmer Rouge prison he ran, but simultaneously argued that he was following orders he could not reject.

article
24 February 2010 by Sebastian Gottlieb & Vessela Evrova

Austria came under fire earlier this month for refusing asylum to a Serbian man who turned over the infamous “Scorpion tape” to international prosecutors in The Hague.

article
10 February 2010 by -

The 99th edition of the International Justice Tribune is now available. You can read it here.

Download the print version of the International Justice Tribune 99 (PDF file)

Subscribe to the International Justice Tribune

IJT 99 contents:

Pages