article
07 April 2010 by -

The 103rd edition of the International Justice Tribune is now available. You can read it here.

Download the print version of the International Justice Tribune 103 (PDF file)

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IJT 103 contents:   

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07 April 2010 by -

Some 10,000 people are still considered missing almost 15 years after the end of the war in Bosnia, the International Committee for the Red Cross (ICRC) said this week.

ICRC would continue “to work towards shedding a light over the fate of all missing persons” from the 1992-95 conflict, said Henry Fournier, ICRC head for Bosnia.

“There are still some 10,000 missing whose fate remains unknown and their names are still on the ICRC lists” of missing persons, the ICRC statement said.

article
07 April 2010 by Hermione Gee

The United Nations and the Dutch state cannot be prosecuted for failing to protect Bosnian victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide, a Dutch appeals court ruled today, rejecting a suit filed against both parties by a victims rights’ group.

issue
07 April 2010

ICC probes Kenya violence

Investigators of The Hague’s International Criminal Court (ICC) have travelled to Kenya to probe the country’s post-election violence,a move welcomed by a number of local organisations. 

UN immmunity in Srebrenica case

The United Nations and the Dutch state cannot be prosecuted for failing to protect Bosnian victims of the 1995 Srebrenica genocide, a Dutch appeals court ruled last week, rejecting a suit filed by a victims rights’ group. 

ECHR looks at Italy’s asylum policy

The European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg is considering a landmark lawsuit filed by 23 asylum seekers against the Italian state, which in the past year has intercepted boats filled with potential migrants in international waters and shipping them off to Libya.  

“Fake child soldiers” at Lubanga trial

Catherine Mabille and Marc Desalliers represent former Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, who stands trial at The Hague’s International Criminal Court (ICC) for conscripting and using child soldiers. The lawyers have complained about ongoing problems during the trial.

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07 April 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Catherine Mabille and Marc Desalliers represent former Congolese militia leader Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, who stands trial at The Hague’s International Criminal Court (ICC) for conscripting and using child soldiers. The lawyers have complained about ongoing problems during the trial.

article
07 April 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Investigators of The Hague’s International Criminal Court (ICC) have travelled to Kenya to probe the country’s post-election violence, a move welcomed by a number of local organisations. 

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07 April 2010 by Linawati Sidarto

The European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg is considering a landmark lawsuit filed by 23 asylum seekers against the Italian state, which in the past year has intercepted boats filled with potential migrants in international waters and shipping them off to Libya.

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06 April 2010 by -

Rwanda's Supreme Court has ruled that only the country's military court can hear a plea seeking the release of former Congolese warlord Laurent Nkunda, his lawyer said on Saturday.

 Aime Bokanga, counsel for the former leader of the National Congress for the Defence of the People (CNDP), said he was relieved that Nkunda had finally secured a court hearing, but was disappointed the court had not ruled his detention illegal.

Nkunda has been under house arrest in Kigali since January last year.

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01 April 2010 by -

The trial of Radovan Karadžić is scheduled to resume on 13 April with the start of the presentation of the prosecution’s evidence.

By Thijs Bouwknegt

The order was made on the back of the appeals chamber’s dismissal of Karadžić’s appeal  to allow him to postpone his trial.

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31 March 2010 by -

The Serbian parliament early Wednesday passed a landmark resolution condemning the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of some 8,000 Bosnian Muslims but stopped short of labeling the killings a genocide.

The adoption of the text with a majority of 127 of the 173 lawmakers present ends years of denial by Serbian politicians about the scale of the killings.

"The parliament of Serbia strongly condemns the crime committed against the Bosnian Muslim population of Srebrenica in July 1995, as determined by the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ruling," the text says.

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