article
23 January 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon and Benjamin Bibas

On January 10, Serge Brammertz, the deputy prosecutor in charge of investigations at the International Criminal Court (ICC), was given a six-month temporary assignment as head of the UN's fact-finding committee on the assassination of the former Lebanese Prime Minister. Since his departure, Congolese NGOs, which had already advised the Court to issue arrest warrants before the December 18 referendum, are concerned that the ICC "legal proceedings will be stalled" in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). In a country where individuals suspected of war crimes hold political office, and whose terms may be renewed following the March 5 legislative elections, the question is: why is the ICC waiting to issue its first arrest warrants in the DRC?

issue
19 December 2005

IER wages democratic bet

On December 16, Moroccan King Mohammed VI ordered that the Equity and Reconciliation Commission's (IER) final report be made public. The King's dahir (royal decree) establishing the IER has been interpreted in radically different ways since it was issued on January 7, 2004. For some, this commission - the first of its kind in the Arab-Islamic world - was a source of hope for democratization. The many skeptics, on the other hand, saw it as a cunning tool for Morocco's king, designed to reinforce his legitimacy and to project the image of a modern country concerned with human rights. What has IER revealed?

Gotovina: myth and demons

The arrest on December 8 in Spain of Croatian General Ante Gotovina, one of the main suspects wanted by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), sparked a wave of protests all over Croatia. Right wing leader Anto Djapic said that the arrest of Gotovina was a difficult day for Croatia, for all Croatian war veterans and for all those who respect Gotovina as a national hero. However, the Prime Minister and the Arch-Bishop of Makarska, south of Split, called upon citizens to try and understand why this moment was good for their country.

Van Anraat, sole chemical agent

Dutch prosecutors needed eleven hours on 7 December for their closing arguments against Frans van Anraat, the Dutch citizen accused of complicity in genocide on trial before a federal court in The Hague for his sales of chemicals to the Saddam Hussein regime in the 1980's. After a three-week trial, the prosecution requested the maximum prison sentence of 15 years. The prosecutor argued that the 63- year old Dutchman had known that the thousands of tons of thiodiglycol (TDG) he supplied were converted to chemical weapons, which Iraq used to attack Iran and its own Kurdish population.

"A trial should never last more than 18 months total"

Interview with Claude Jorda, judge at the International Criminal Court

Brief news:
• Wrapping up Milosevic trial
• Lukic: Argentina demands guarantees from the ICTY
• 14 Serbs convicted in Belgrade
• Spain has jurisdiction to try Cavallo
• Iraq: Saddam Hussein's trial really begins
• ICTR: Aloys Simba gets 25 years in prison

article
19 December 2005 by Franck Petit

Interview with Claude Jorda, judge at the International Criminal Court

article
19 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Dutch prosecutors needed eleven hours on 7 December for their closing arguments against Frans van Anraat, the Dutch citizen accused of complicity in genocide on trial before a federal court in The Hague for his sales of chemicals to the Saddam Hussein regime in the 1980's. After a three-week trial, the prosecution requested the maximum prison sentence of 15 years. The prosecutor argued that the 63- year old Dutchman had known that the thousands of tons of thiodiglycol (TDG) he supplied were converted to chemical weapons, which Iraq used to attack Iran and its own Kurdish population.

article
19 December 2005 by Massimo Moratti

The arrest on December 8 in Spain of Croatian General Ante Gotovina, one of the main suspects wanted by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), sparked a wave of protests all over Croatia. Right wing leader Anto Djapic said that the arrest of Gotovina was a difficult day for Croatia, for all Croatian war veterans and for all those who respect Gotovina as a national hero. However, the Prime Minister and the Arch-Bishop of Makarska, south of Split, called upon citizens to try and understand why this moment was good for their country.

article
19 December 2005 by Pierre Hazan

On December 16, Moroccan King Mohammed VI ordered that the Equity and Reconciliation Commission's (IER) final report be made public. The King's dahir (royal decree) establishing the IER has been interpreted in radically different ways since it was issued on January 7, 2004. For some, this commission - the first of its kind in the Arab-Islamic world - was a source of hope for democratization. The many skeptics, on the other hand, saw it as a cunning tool for Morocco's king, designed to reinforce his legitimacy and to project the image of a modern country concerned with human rights. What has IER revealed?

article
05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

While in New York on 6 October, William Swing, head of the UN mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), announced at a press conference that arrest warrants had been issued by the International Criminal Court (ICC) against five leaders of the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA), a rebel group in Northern Uganda. A week before, the American diplomat had already told the Security Council about the arrest warrants in closed session. His notes were leaked to a Reuters reporter, who was first to spread the news. After months of preparing the first round of arrest warrants, ICC Prosecutor Luis Moreno Ocampo had to watch silently while others spoke out and vented opinions about still sealed documents. In terms of a communication strategy, it was a remarkable fiasco.

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05 December 2005 by B. Bibas E. Chicon and F. Petit

Thousands of NGOs worldwide have been advocating for the International Criminal Court (ICC) for years. During the fourth Assembly of States Parties (ASP), which ended on December 3 in The Hague, dozens of them came to spur on the Court, in some cases not so gently.

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05 December 2005 by our correspondent in Arusha

On November 21, Juvénal Uwilingiyimana left his home in Anderlecht, Belgium at dawn. Since then, the former Rwandan minister has gone missing. In a letter dated November 5 published on the Internet, he accuses the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) of trying to force him to accuse high-ranking dignitaries of the former regime. On November 29, the prosecutor replied by charging Uwilingiyimana with genocide.

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05 December 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

On 29 November, in an unusual show of unanimity, both the accused Slobodan Milosevic and prosecutor Geoffrey Nice opposed the severance of the Kosovo case from the Bosnia and the Croatia cases, as proposed by the Trial Chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in this long-winded, nearly 4-year trial. The idea of the judges is to let the former president of Yugoslavia finish his Kosovo defence and quickly wind up this case with a judgement.

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