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Stephen Rapp speaking at a Coalition for the ICC event in 2013 (Photo: Flickr/CICC)
30 September 2015

IJT 186 is our first issue after the summer break and also the first in our new publishing scheme of a monthly digest of our feature articles which appeared on our site previously.

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Inhabitants of the Menik Farm internally displaced person camp in Sri Lanka await a visit by the UN secretary-general in 2009 (Photo: Flickr/UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe)
23 September 2015 by Frances Harrison, London (UK)

I learned exactly how a friend of mine was executed from the forensic examination the UN report did of the photographs of his corpse. His hands were tied behind his back and he was shot multiple times from behind. At least I now know he wasn’t tortured before he died, and in the warped world of Sri Lanka, that’s some comfort. I cannot imagine what it is like for his wife to relive this again.

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16 September 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

After grumbling from Chad that people there could not properly follow the proceedings of Hissène Habré, which resumed this month before the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC), the trial of the ex-dictator was suddenly broadcast live on national television Tuesday.

Despite reported trouble with the audio-feed, this was the first time many victims in Chad – where 99 percent of the population lacks access to the internet and cannot follow the live-stream the EAC provides on its website – could see testimony in the case against their country’s former leader, accused of war crimes, crimes against humanity and torture.

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Stephen Rapp speaking at a Coalition for the ICC event in 2013 (Photo: Flickr/CICC)
09 September 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Stephen Rapp told IJT that his office did everything they practically could do to ensure accountability in Syria by "documenting the heck" out of the atrocities that are being committed and collecting "irrefutable evidence". In one of his first interviews since stepping down last month as US Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues, Rapp named the arrest of former Bosnian Serb military chief Ratko Mladic as his finest moment in office.

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Bosco Ntaganda at the start of his trial (Flickr/ ICC-CPI)
02 September 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The trial of Congolese warlord Bosco Ntaganda which opened before the International Criminal Court Wednesday is a test of the prosecutor’s new strategy to look at sexual and gender-based violence in all of the cases [IJT-179].

In this case,  for the first time, the ICC has agreed that sexual violence against child soldiers by their own commanders could constitute a war crime. 

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ICTY prosecutor Serge Brammertz
11 July 2015 by Serge Brammertz and Michelle Jarvis

In this opinion piece prosecutor Serge Brammertz of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and Michelle Jarvis, the principal legal counsel in the office of the prosecutor, reflect on the Srebrenica massacre as a dramatic example of how gender influences the experiences of war victims. 

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ICTY and MICT president Judge Theodor Meron speaks to IJT (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
08 July 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg and Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In the lead-up to the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslims, IJT spoke to the president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Judge Theodor Meron answered questions about the genocide and efforts to close the ICTY and hand over its remaining functions to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), where he also serves as president. 

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ICTY and MICT president Judge Theodor Meron speaks to IJT (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
08 July 2015

IJT 185 is a free special issue to mark the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre. The murder of some 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys is the only atrocity in post-WWII Europe that was officially labeled a genocide by two international courts, and it has helped shape international laws on genocide. For this issue, International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) president Theodor Meron answers questions about handing over the court's remaining functions to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), where he also serves as president.

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A woman takes pause amidst graves in Srebrenica (Photo: Flickr/mikel_oibar)
07 July 2015 by Cintia Taylor and IJT

Five years ago, reporter Cintia Taylor visited Srebrenica for the official commemoration of the 11 July massacre. Her report of a divided town where Bosnian Serbs and Bosnian Muslims regard each other with suspicion remains relevant today. The original story [IJT-110] has been edited for IJT’s special issue acknowledging Srebrenica’s 20th anniversary.

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Photo exhibit used in ICTY Srebrenica cases of a single shoe left at Branjevo Military Farm (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
07 July 2015 by Heikelina Verrijn Stuart and IJT

For IJT’s special issue acknowledging the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre, we are publishing an edited version of a November 2005 article [IJT-29] by international law expert Heikelina Verrijn Stuart. It illustrates how the ICTY was shaping the law of genocide a decade ago. 

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