article
10 April 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

This week the UN Security Council may ask the Netherlands to host the Special Court for Sierra Leone, established four years ago in Freetown, so that it can try its most important defendant, former Liberian president Charles Taylor, who has been incarcerated since March 29. Officially, security is the reason cited for this relocation, which would bring an end to the " Sierra Leonean model. " More than likely though, it is the result of a political agreement.

issue
27 March 2006

Beyond Ituri: the other side of the Ugandan case

The transfer of Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, head of the Union of Congolese Patriots (UPC) to The Hague on March 17 stirred up questions about the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) investigations into the support given to the Congolese militia in Ituri (Democratic Republic of Congo). Thus far, the ICC has targeted only the leaders of the Lord’s Resistance Army rebel group and not a single officer of the Ugandan army in its investigations into Uganda. However, the court may be setting its sights on several high-ranking Ugandan officers in the Ituri case.

What can be salvaged from the Milosevic trial?

Not all the evidence presented during the four-year trial of Slobodan Milosevic, who died on March 11, will be lost. The rules of evidence at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) state that facts established in a trial may not be transferred to another trial until the first trial has been finalized. But even if Milosevic had lived, the trial chamber’s ruling would have been appealed and the appeals decision would not have been made in time for the evidence to be used in many of the other upcoming cases. Now that Milosevic is dead, there are still some options for recycling at least part of the evidence accumulated in his trial.

Confessions - a key to wrapping up trials in ICTR

​The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) is on the verge of concluding at least two guilty pleas, including one from Joseph Serugendo, former head of the Interahamwe militia who appeared in a closed session on March 15. Some of the detainees are preparing to follow his lead, while others are watching with interest to see the outcome of the negotiations with the prosecutor. The subject is still a sensitive one, and the UN tribunal is nervously pursuing this strategy it deems essential to concluding all its trials before 2008.

Brief news:
• Nigeria ready to hand over Taylor
• ICTY
Editorial - An alarming decision for freedom of the press
Bosnian generals receive light sentences
UNMIK keeps an eye on Haradinaj
• Peru
Revolutionary movement Tupac Amaru convicted in Peru

article
27 March 2006 by BENJAMIN BIBAS and EMMANUEL CHICON

The transfer of Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, head of the Union of Congolese Patriots (UPC) to The Hague on March 17 stirred up questions about the International Criminal Court’s (ICC) investigations into the support given to the Congolese militia in Ituri (Democratic Republic of Congo). Thus far, the ICC has targeted only the leaders of the Lord’s Resistance Army rebel group and not a single officer of the Ugandan army in its investigations into Uganda. However, the court may be setting its sights on several high-ranking Ugandan officers in the Ituri case.

article
26 March 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Not all the evidence presented during the four-year trial of Slobodan Milosevic, who died on March 11, will be lost. The rules of evidence at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) state that facts established in a trial may not be transferred to another trial until the first trial has been finalized. But even if Milosevic had lived, the trial chamber’s ruling would have been appealed and the appeals decision would not have been made in time for the evidence to be used in many of the other upcoming cases. Now that Milosevic is dead, there are still some options for recycling at least part of the evidence accumulated in his trial.

article
26 March 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier and our correspondent in Arusha

The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) is on the verge of concluding at least two guilty pleas, including one from Joseph Serugendo, former head of the Interahamwe militia who appeared in a closed session on March 15. Some of the detainees are preparing to follow his lead, while others are watching with interest to see the outcome of the negotiations with the prosecutor. The subject is still a sensitive one, and the UN tribunal is nervously pursuing this strategy it deems essential to concluding all its trials before 2008.

article
13 March 2006 by KELVIN LEWIS

Samuel Hinga Norman is currently the most well-known defendant standing trial before the Special Court for Sierra Leone. He is also the most controversial. Three years after his arrest, the former head of the Civil Defense Forces (CDF) kicked off his defense with some high caliber witnesses.

article
13 March 2006 by Adele Waugaman

Interview with Said Tayeb Jawad, Afghan Ambassador to the United States

On February 25, the Kabul National Security Court sentenced to death the first person to be tried and convicted for war crimes in Afghanistan. The organization Afghanistan Justice Project called the trial "fundamentally flawed." In an interview with IJT eight days before the verdict, the Afghan Ambassador to the United States discussed how justice in his country is being carried out in a sensitive political environment.

article
13 March 2006 by our correspondent in Arusha

In February 2004, André Ntagerura, former government minister, and Emmanuel Bagambiki, former prefect, were acquitted by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). Yet they remained in detention during the two-year appeals process. On February 8, 2006, their acquittals were upheld, but they are still under house arrest. No country wants to take in a genocide suspect, even one who has been cleared by an international court.

article
13 March 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier and Didace Kanyugu

Six months after the new government took power in Burundi, little headway has been made in the negotiations with the UN on setting up institutions to render justice for crimes committed over the past four decades. However, a still confidential government document gives a preliminary indication of the Burundian authorities' choices. Bujumbura's proposed truth and reconciliation commission and special court appear to be surprisingly expansive and firm-handed.

article
13 March 2006 by Thierry Cruvellier

On February 15, the prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) filed a motion to transfer Michel Bagaragaza's trial to Norway, which has agreed to try him. There are, however, ulterior motives behind this apparent successful attempt to lighten the Arusha tribunal's caseload.

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