article
Radovan Karadzic at his initial appearance before the ICTY in July, 2008
08 October 2014 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Prosecutors at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) last week demanded a life sentence for former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic. He faces charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during the bloody 1992-1995 Bosnian war.

issue
08 October 2014

Links to articles and PDF of IJT issue 167.

article
08 October 2014 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Prosecutors at the International Criminal Court (ICC) are struggling to maintain their case against Kenyan vice president William Ruto and his co-accused, radio broadcaster Joshua Sang. As the evidence continues to dribble away, the defence plans to ask for an acquittal halfway through the trial. Both Ruto and Sang are accused of crimes against humanity committed during the post-election violence in Kenya in 2007 and 2008.

article
08 October 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg

A recent ruling by a Netherlands court on the responsibilities of peacekeepers has implications for future operations worldwide, says researcher Lenneke Sprik, who specializes in the laws governing peacekeeping and humanitarian interventions.

article
ICC prosecutor Fatou Bensouda. Copyright ICC-CPI/Flickr
08 October 2014 by Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

A year ago this month, the International Criminal Court’s Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) presented a strategic plan dramatically changing its approach to investigations. The changes followed a series of humiliating defeats the office suffered at the confirmation of charges stage in various hearings. Thus, out went short, focused probes. In came in-depth, open-ended ones that could be revolutionary. And yet today, the OTP is still arguing for increased resources.

article
08 October 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg

ICTR authorities in Kigali reacted with relief last week when the appeals chamber of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) upheld genocide convictions in cases against three political leaders and an army official. 

article
08 October 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg

Lawyers for former Khmer Rouge leaders Khieu Samphan and Nuon Chea last week filed appeals against the life sentences that judges of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) issued in August for crimes against humanity.

article
STL Courtroom in The Hague. Copyright STL-TSL/Flickr
08 October 2014 by Karina Hof, The Hague (The Netherlands)

While prosecution witnesses continue to give technical forensic testimonies in the trial against five men suspected of orchestrating the 2005 explosion that killed Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri, two contempt cases at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) vie for the spotlight.

article
24 September 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg

Despite successes, national war crimes units still rely too heavily on local counterparts, says a Human Rights Watch report comparing three EU members that use universal jurisdiction to prosecute war crimes and crimes against humanity. For the 109-page report ‘The long arm of justice’, Leslie Haskell looked at how war crimes units in the Netherlands, Germany and France operated and what could be learnt from them. HRW chose the Netherlands for having the oldest and most robust unit, and France and Germany for having units less than five years old. 

article
24 September 2014 by Christopher Stephen, Tripoli (Libya)

Just when The Hague thought it was finished with Libya, the International Criminal Court finds itself preparing fresh investigations for the strife-torn country.

Pages