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05 November 2014 by David Bergman

A spate of rulings against leaders of Bangladesh’s biggest Islamist opposition party for atrocities during the war in 1971 shows the International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) forging ahead – despite continuing criticism from outside the country.

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05 November 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg

A judge in Argentina last week requested that Spain extradite 20 Franco-era officials accused of human rights violations during the Spanish dictatorship who cannot be tried at home because of an amnesty enacted in the late 1970s.

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Image from July 2013 protest in New York City against US military intervention in Syria (Photo: Flickr/fleshmanpix)
05 November 2014 by Karina Hof, The Hague (The Netherlands)

A justice mechanism to deal with the Syrian conflict has seemed low on the world’s agenda. This week brought news of US government funding cuts for a widely commended NGO gathering Syrian war crimes evidence. The Russian and Chinese vetoes of a Syria referral by the UN Security Council to the International Criminal Court keep a trial in The Hague unlikely. And it is hard to focus on accountability when the YouTubed horror films of ISIS have all but upstaged Assad regime atrocities and the Syrian opposition seems locked in an endless cycle of reincarnation.

 

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05 November 2014 by Samuel Okiror

Uganda’s government programme for the social and economic reintegration of some 27,000 amnesty-granted former armed rebels has stalled, leaving thousands with few options to earn a living.

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22 October 2014 by Julia Wallace

After an initial guilty verdict in August for two former Khmer Rouge leaders on charges of crimes against humanity – and strong admonitions from the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC)’s appellate judges for its trial chamber to hurry up – substantive hearings are underway in what is known as Case 002/02. 

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22 October 2014

Links to articles and PDF of IJT issue number 168.

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22 October 2014 by Marc-André Boisvert, Abidjan (Ivory Coast)

Just weeks after the final public sessions of Ivory Coast’s Commission for Dialogue, Truth and Reconciliation, victims’ advocates say the process has failed and reconciliation still seems a long way off.

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22 October 2014 by Isabelle Wesselingh, Bucharest (Romania)

For the first time since the fall of Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu a quarter-century ago, a Communist-era prison commander faces charges of crimes against humanity. The landmark trial of Alexandru Visinescu could help Romanians come to terms with their country’s totalitarian legacy. Survivors of the grisly Ramnicu Sarat prison in eastern Romania waited for decades to see the former chief appear before judges.

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22 October 2014 by Karina Hof

For centuries, states have invoked universal jurisdiction to prosecute piracy in local courts. Yet the past few years have seen a change in tide, with more countries essentially outsourcing piracy cases to specially set up courts in Mauritius, Kenya and Seychelles. Five days before the start of UAE Counter-Piracy Week 2014 in Dubai, Michael Scharf, interim dean at Case Western Reserve University School of Law and chair of the Public International Law and Policy Group’s piracy working group, takes stock of recent perspectives on piracy. 

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22 October 2014 by Nathalie Magnien

The simmering tensions between Chad and the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) in charge of the Hissène Habré case came to a boil last week. After months of inaction, N’Djamena has now officially refused to extradite two suspects and on 14 October backed out of a deal to allow court officials to question them in Chad.

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