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22 October 2014

Links to articles and PDF of IJT issue number 168.

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22 October 2014 by Marc-André Boisvert, Abidjan (Ivory Coast)

Just weeks after the final public sessions of Ivory Coast’s Commission for Dialogue, Truth and Reconciliation, victims’ advocates say the process has failed and reconciliation still seems a long way off.

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22 October 2014 by Isabelle Wesselingh, Bucharest (Romania)

For the first time since the fall of Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu a quarter-century ago, a Communist-era prison commander faces charges of crimes against humanity. The landmark trial of Alexandru Visinescu could help Romanians come to terms with their country’s totalitarian legacy. Survivors of the grisly Ramnicu Sarat prison in eastern Romania waited for decades to see the former chief appear before judges.

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22 October 2014 by Karina Hof

For centuries, states have invoked universal jurisdiction to prosecute piracy in local courts. Yet the past few years have seen a change in tide, with more countries essentially outsourcing piracy cases to specially set up courts in Mauritius, Kenya and Seychelles. Five days before the start of UAE Counter-Piracy Week 2014 in Dubai, Michael Scharf, interim dean at Case Western Reserve University School of Law and chair of the Public International Law and Policy Group’s piracy working group, takes stock of recent perspectives on piracy. 

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22 October 2014 by Nathalie Magnien

The simmering tensions between Chad and the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) in charge of the Hissène Habré case came to a boil last week. After months of inaction, N’Djamena has now officially refused to extradite two suspects and on 14 October backed out of a deal to allow court officials to question them in Chad.

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Radovan Karadzic at his initial appearance before the ICTY in July, 2008
08 October 2014 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Prosecutors at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) last week demanded a life sentence for former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic. He faces charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during the bloody 1992-1995 Bosnian war.

issue
08 October 2014

Links to articles and PDF of IJT issue 167.

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08 October 2014 by Benjamin Duerr, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Prosecutors at the International Criminal Court (ICC) are struggling to maintain their case against Kenyan vice president William Ruto and his co-accused, radio broadcaster Joshua Sang. As the evidence continues to dribble away, the defence plans to ask for an acquittal halfway through the trial. Both Ruto and Sang are accused of crimes against humanity committed during the post-election violence in Kenya in 2007 and 2008.

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08 October 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg

A recent ruling by a Netherlands court on the responsibilities of peacekeepers has implications for future operations worldwide, says researcher Lenneke Sprik, who specializes in the laws governing peacekeeping and humanitarian interventions.

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ICC prosecutor Fatou Bensouda. Copyright ICC-CPI/Flickr
08 October 2014 by Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

A year ago this month, the International Criminal Court’s Office of the Prosecutor (OTP) presented a strategic plan dramatically changing its approach to investigations. The changes followed a series of humiliating defeats the office suffered at the confirmation of charges stage in various hearings. Thus, out went short, focused probes. In came in-depth, open-ended ones that could be revolutionary. And yet today, the OTP is still arguing for increased resources.

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