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President Kenyatta and his defence team, with lawyer Steven Kay in first row, at 8 December 2014 status conference (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
24 February 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This is the first in a series of articles delving into the challenges faced by prosecutors at the International Criminal Court. In our next issue, Tjitske Lingsma focuses on the use of intermediaries in situation countries. In the third article, we examine the growing importance of technological evidence, like phone records and computer data, to reduce the reliance on witness testimony.

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American journalist Elizabeth Becker testifies as an expert witness in Case 002/02 at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Court of Cambodia (Photo: ECCC/Nhet Sok Heng/Flickr/krtribunal)
23 February 2015 by Ate Hoekstra, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

When former Washington Post correspondent Elizabeth Becker testified as an expert witness this month at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Court of Cambodia (ECCC), she described a surreal visit to Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge regime where “every move was controlled” and everything staged for foreign journalists' benefit.

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Mbacké Fall, prosecutor of the Extraordinary African Chambers (Photo: ForumChambresAfricaines.org)
22 February 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

Hissène Habré is due to face trial in Senegal within three months of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) 13 February ruling that there is enough evidence against the former Chadian dictator to proceed. 

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KLA memorial in Mitorvica, Kosovo (Photo: Joost van Egmond)
22 February 2015 by Una Hajdari, Pristina (Kosovo)

A document leaked last week to Kosovar media provides legal background for a court that will deal with crimes allegedly committed by the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) from 1998 to 2000.

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LRA child memorial (Photo: Flickr/Josh Zakary)
21 February 2015 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Kampala (Uganda)

Uganda's decision to support the transfer of Dominic Ongwen [IJT-174] to the International Criminal Court (ICC), instead of trying the notorious Lord's Resistance Army commander at home, casts a shadow on the county's ability to hold domestic war crimes trials.

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11 February 2015

Issue 175 of IJT looks at what the Lebanon tribunal offers its participating victims, notably in view of the Hariri assassination’s tenth anniversary. From the Balkans, one article deals with the ICJ's dismissal of Croatia’s and Serbia's mutual claims of genocide; the other looks at the ICTY’s jurisprudence on the so-called crime of crimes. Guatemala expert Mike Allison updates us on the Ríos Montt genocide trial in Central America. And from Romania, we ask if the first trial of a Communist-era prison warden is becoming a missed opportunity. In short news, we hear how the Habré trial is progressing and about the Comoros’ latest request of the ICC.

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 The Popovic et al. trial at the ICTY on 30 January 2015 (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
11 February 2015 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Recent weeks have brought genocide in the Balkans back into the spotlight, but not just at the International Court of Justice.

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Serbian delegation interviewed by journalists inside the Peace Palace, which holds the seat of the ICJ (Photo: Sandra Milic)
11 February 2015 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands) and Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

Some hoped it would be the end of an era when the UN’s judicial branch last week ruled that neither side of the 1991-1995 war in Croatia committed genocide. After the International Court of Justice’s ruling on Bosnia in 2007, Belgrade could think this was the last ICJ lawsuit it would face. But now Kosovo is determined to have its day in court.

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STL judges hear the prosecution's opening statement on 16 January 2014 (Photo: Reuters/Toussaint Kluiters/United Photos/POOL/Flickr/stlebanon)
11 February 2015 by Karina Hof, Leidschendam (The Netherlands)

On Saturday, Ehsan Fayed will be doing what she often does on 14 February: go to the home of her mother-in-law, gather with the wider family and, along with her two teenage daughters, visit the mosque where her husband is buried. His grave is not far from the shrine of former Lebanese prime minster Rafiq Hariri, the man Talal Nasser spent 23 years working as a bodyguard for and the man he spent his final minutes with when, on 14 February 2005, a bomb in downtown Beirut killed them and 20 others.

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The Comoros-flagged Mavi Marmara (Photo: Flickr/yasinonat)
10 February 2015 by Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Last week, the Comoros broke new legal ground at the International Criminal Court (ICC). Lawyers representing the African island nation challenged the prosecutor's decision to reject the demand to open an official investigation into the events surrounding Israel’s raid on a flotilla of activists attempting to run a naval blockade off the Gaza Strip in 2010.

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