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LRA child memorial (Photo: Flickr/Josh Zakary)
21 February 2015 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Kampala (Uganda)

Uganda's decision to support the transfer of Dominic Ongwen [IJT-174] to the International Criminal Court (ICC), instead of trying the notorious Lord's Resistance Army commander at home, casts a shadow on the county's ability to hold domestic war crimes trials.

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Serbian delegation interviewed by journalists inside the Peace Palace, which holds the seat of the ICJ (Photo: Sandra Milic)
11 February 2015 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands) and Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

Some hoped it would be the end of an era when the UN’s judicial branch last week ruled that neither side of the 1991-1995 war in Croatia committed genocide. After the International Court of Justice’s ruling on Bosnia in 2007, Belgrade could think this was the last ICJ lawsuit it would face. But now Kosovo is determined to have its day in court.

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STL judges hear the prosecution's opening statement on 16 January 2014 (Photo: Reuters/Toussaint Kluiters/United Photos/POOL/Flickr/stlebanon)
11 February 2015 by Karina Hof, Leidschendam (The Netherlands)

On Saturday, Ehsan Fayed will be doing what she often does on 14 February: go to the home of her mother-in-law, gather with the wider family and, along with her two teenage daughters, visit the mosque where her husband is buried. His grave is not far from the shrine of former Lebanese prime minster Rafiq Hariri, the man Talal Nasser spent 23 years working as a bodyguard for and the man he spent his final minutes with when, on 14 February 2005, a bomb in downtown Beirut killed them and 20 others.

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11 February 2015

Issue 175 of IJT looks at what the Lebanon tribunal offers its participating victims, notably in view of the Hariri assassination’s tenth anniversary. From the Balkans, one article deals with the ICJ's dismissal of Croatia’s and Serbia's mutual claims of genocide; the other looks at the ICTY’s jurisprudence on the so-called crime of crimes. Guatemala expert Mike Allison updates us on the Ríos Montt genocide trial in Central America. And from Romania, we ask if the first trial of a Communist-era prison warden is becoming a missed opportunity. In short news, we hear how the Habré trial is progressing and about the Comoros’ latest request of the ICC.

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 The Popovic et al. trial at the ICTY on 30 January 2015 (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
11 February 2015 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Recent weeks have brought genocide in the Balkans back into the spotlight, but not just at the International Court of Justice.

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The Comoros-flagged Mavi Marmara (Photo: Flickr/yasinonat)
10 February 2015 by Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Last week, the Comoros broke new legal ground at the International Criminal Court (ICC). Lawyers representing the African island nation challenged the prosecutor's decision to reject the demand to open an official investigation into the events surrounding Israel’s raid on a flotilla of activists attempting to run a naval blockade off the Gaza Strip in 2010.

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Palais du 15 Janvier in N'Djaména, where the trial of 21 alleged Habré accomplices opened in November (Flickr/kendoerr)
10 February 2015 by Nathalie Magnien, N'Djamena (Chad)

The prosecutor of the Extraordinary African Chambers (EAC) last week filed his final indictment against Hissène Habré, bringing the trial of the former Chadian president [IJT-165] one step closer to reality.

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Ex-dictator General Efrain Rios testifying during his trial in Guatemala (Photo: Flickr/Elena Hermosa/trocaire)
09 February 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg

The trial of ex-dictator Efraín Ríos Montt [IJT-153] resumed last month in Guatemala after his 2013 genocide conviction was annulled on a technicality. The trial was set back to where it left off on 19 April 2013, when the tribunal had heard all prosecution witnesses but still needed to hear some defence witnesses and closing arguments. But just a few days after restarting, the trial ground to a halt again and was quickly suspended with no outlook on when it could resume.

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Interior of Ramincu Sarat prison in Romania (Photo: IICCMER)
09 February 2015 by Isabelle Wesselingh, Bucharest (Romania)

The first trial of a Communist-era prison commander charged with crimes against humanity [IJT-168], in a case the media have dubbed “Romania's Nuremberg”, raised great expectations. But after a few months, many people in the country still struggling to reconcile with its past have voiced disappointment.

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Ex-LRA commander Dominic Ongwen makes his first appearance at the ICC (Flickr/ICC-CPI)
28 January 2015 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Kampala (Uganda)

The handover of Dominic Ongwen, a notorious Ugandan commander in the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), to the International Criminal Court (ICC) has raised debate on whether he should face trial or be pardoned.

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