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Urban life in Ivory Coast (Photo: Flickr/Guillaume Mignot)
23 March 2015 by Christin Roby, Abidjan (Ivory Coast)

The 20-year prison sentence handed to former Ivorian first lady Simone Gbagbo in Abidjan’s case against her and 82 others for undermining state security is being met with intense scrutiny. Though a victory to some, many Ivorians are unsatisfied.

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At a shelter for Yazidis refugees who fled IS attacks in Iraq, Mahoubet says the jihadist movement killed her husband and kidnapped her sister and daughter (Photo: Flickr/Caroline Gluck/EU/ECHO)
23 March 2015 by Karina Hof

The Islamic State (IS) is perpetuating heinous human rights violations in Iraq and members of the jihadist movement may be guilty of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity, says a UN report released last week. Its author, the High Commissioner for Human Rights, recommends Iraq join the International Criminal Court and accept its jurisdiction “over the current situation”.

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Skulls in the Choeung Ek memorial of people murdered during the Khmer Rouge regime led by Pol Pot from 1975-1979 (Photo: Flickr/sctatepdx)
11 March 2015 by Julia Wallace, Phnom Penh (Cambodia)

After over five years of investigation fraught with infighting, government interference and legal drama, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) has charged two more Khmer Rouge officials with a slew of crimes. They include murder, enslavement, extermination and grave breaches of the Geneva Convention.

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ICC judges in Germain Katanga and Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui case on a visit to Ituri in January 2012 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
11 March 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This is the second in a series of articles delving into the challenges faced by prosecutors at the International Criminal Court. In our last issue [IJT-176], Tjitske Lingsma explored why the ICC seems afflicted by untruthful witnesses. In the third article, we examine the growing importance of technological evidence, like phone records and computer data, to reduce the reliance on witness testimony.

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Former dictator Efraín Ríos Montt on trial for genocide in May 2013 in Guatemala City (Photo: Flickr/coolloud)
11 March 2015

IJT 177 asks how far the two new cases at the ECCC can go after Judge Mark Harmon finally filed charges against two mid-level Khmer Rouge officials in a case fraught with infighting and legal drama at the hybrid tribunal. Another hybrid court, the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, recently began a newly issued three-year mandate. Expectations for the court have now exceeded judging those responsible for the 2005 assassination of ex-prime minister Rafik Hariri, with experts set on the STL providing a basis to bring the Syrian regime to book.

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Former dictator Efraín Ríos Montt on trial for genocide in May 2013 in Guatemala City (Photo: Flickr/coolloud)
10 March 2015 by Louisa Reynolds, Guatemala City (Guatemala)

The road to justice for the victims of human rights violations committed during Guatemala’s 36-year civil war has been long and fraught with obstacles. Prosecuting wartime violators has proven slow. And with the September elections looming and the UN-sponsored International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG) about to conclude its mandate, the outcome of current and future trials grows increasingly uncertain.

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ICC's office of public counsel for victims at the Lubanga appeals hearing on 3 March 2015 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
10 March 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In a landmark appeals ruling last week, the International Criminal Court (ICC) issued guidelines on reparations to victims in the Lubanga case that are expected to lead the court in future cases.

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Images in Beirut commemorating Rafik Hariri, who died ten years ago (Photo: Ana Uzelac)
09 March 2015 by Karina Hof, Leidschendam (The Netherlands)

This month the Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) embarked on a newly reissued three-year mandate. Compared to other international courts, its principal task remains narrow: to try those accused of carrying out the 14 February 2005 assassination of ex-prime minister Rafik Hariri and 21 others in downtown Beirut. But since the Ayyash et al. trial opened in January 2014, expectations of what it might accomplish have soared beyond its headquarters in the Hague suburb of Leidschendam – and beyond Lebanon.

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25 February 2015

Issue 176 of IJT examines why the lawyers of Abdullah al-Senussi, Muammar Gaddafi’s former spy chief, requested review of the ICC decision to let him be tried in Libya. We present the first in a three-part series exploring problems faced by the ICC prosecution. We look at how LRA commander Dominic Ongwen's transfer to the ICC highlights Uganda's struggles to try war criminals at home. And from the Khmer Rouge tribunal, an article details this month’s testimony by former Washington Post correspondent and Cambodia expert Elizabeth Becker about her haunting memories of a trip to Democratic Kampuchea in 1978. In short news, we report on a document leaked last week concerning preparations for Kosovo's special court and the upcoming trial of Chad’s former President Hissène Habré.

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Outside al-Hadba prison in Tripoli, where the trial of Senussi and co-defendants opened on 14 April 2014 (Photo: Chris Stephen)
25 February 2015 by Chris Stephen

The International Criminal Court’s prosecutor ruled that despite civil war in Libya and militias storming the capital, she has no reason to think the country’s former intelligence chief is getting an unfair trial.

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