STL: Hariri suspects unlikely?

31 August 2011 by Daisy Mohr

The Special Tribunal for Lebanon (STL) confirmed last week that the trial in the probe into the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri is expected to start mid-2012. In Lebanon there is hardly anyone who believes the suspects will appear in court.

“I think it is highly unlikely,” says Nicholas Blanford, author of Killing Mr. Lebanon, a book about Hariri’s assassination. “There is a general feeling these guys won’t appear in court. Hezbollah made it clear they won’t cooperate,” continues the Beirut-based British journalist who will publish a book on Hezbollah later this year.

In June the STL issued arrest warrants for four Hezbollah members for involvement in the 2005 killing of the prominent Sunni politician. While the Lebanese authorities reported measures were taken to track them down, they failed to arrest the four men within the 30-day deadline. In the hope of speeding up the arrests the tribunal made the indictment public in mid-August and released the names, photographs and details of the suspects.

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