Northern Uganda’s war survivors feel little impact of ICC victims fund

21 October 2015 by Samuel Egadu Okiror, Lira (Uganda)
Radio talk show in Gulu, Uganda, facilitated by the ICC in commemoration of International Justice Day in July 2011 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
Image caption: 
Radio talk show in Gulu, Uganda, facilitated by the ICC in commemoration of International Justice Day in July 2011 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)

Ugandan war crimes’ victims are growing increasingly frustrated with what they see as too little or too late from the Trust Fund for Victims (TFV). They ask why the fund, which is part of the International Criminal Court (ICC) but operates independently, seems to be scaling back reparations while the court is expanding the charges in its first Ugandan case, against former LRA commander Dominic Ongwen.

This summer, the TVF launched new projects in Lira, northern Uganda. According to the 2015 TVF progress report, this year’s portfolio “amounts to EUR 735,000 and in 2016, the TFV shall endeavour to improve on that figure”.

However, war victims and experts doubt the TFV, established under the Rome Statute to provide aid in situations where the ICC is operational, can really help Ugandans rebuild their lives or regain their dignity and status as fully functional members of society.

Want to read more?

If you subscribe to a free membership, you can read this article and explore our full archive, dating back to 1997.

Subscribe now