Lukic opposes "double transfer"

21 November 2005 by Santiago O’Donnell

Milan Lukic was arrested in Buenos-Aires three months ago. This Bosnian Serb and ex-leader of a paramilitary group in Visegrad has been charged with crimes against humanity by the Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY). In addition to The Hague, he is also wanted in Belgrade and Sarajevo. Now the Argentine courts are wondering to what extent they can let the UN tribunal decide what suits it.

Lukic was one of the ICTY's most wanted war criminals until August 8, when Argentine intelligence agents were tipped off about the arrival that day of Lukic's wife and their 4-year-old daughter on a flight from Paris. The women led the agents straight to Lukic, who was arrested outside an apartment he had been renting in Buenos Aires since his arrival two weeks earlier. The agents were acting on an ICTY arrest warrant that charges Lukic with crimes against humanity committed in Visegrad, Bosnia. During his arraignment before federal judge Jorge Urso, Lukic said he feared for his life and wanted to be remanded to The Hague as soon as possible, praising the tribunal as "fair and honorable." To ensure Lukic's safety, Urso ordered that he be kept isolated in Ezeiza prison where he is presently the sole occupant of a prison unit designed for 17 inmates.

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