A brainless genocide

21 December 2011 by Thierry Cruvellier

December 21, 2011 Time has the same effect on trial judgements rendered by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) as acid on limestone. On December 14, 2011, the Appeals Chamber of the

December 21, 2011 Time has the same effect on trial judgements rendered by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) as acid on limestone. On December 14, 2011, the Appeals Chamber of the ICTR reduced Colonel Bagosora's factual responsibility in the genocide to a minimum, and his life sentence to 35 years. After seventeen years of investigations and trials, the ICTR ends up with no mastermind behind the genocide. It took 14 years after its creation for the ICTR to render the judgement that had been from the start the most eagerly awaited and the most central to its work on the genocide of the Tutsis in Rwanda, between April and July 1994. On December 18, 2008, it found Colonel Théoneste Bagosora guilty of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and sentenced him to life imprisonment. Since 1994, Bagosora had been the `number one suspect by default' of the genocide.However, when it was issued, the judgement by theTrial Chamber appeared iconoclastic.

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